John Chamberlain, MURMUR, 2002

John Chamberlain, MURMUR, 2002, painted and chrome-plated steel, 16 × 26 × 19 inches (40.6 × 66 × 48.3 cm) © 2018 Fairweather & Fairweather LTD / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Rob McKeever

John Chamberlain at Gagosian Gallery



Gagosian Gallery London presents ‘ENTIRELYFEARLESS,’ an exhibition of metal sculpture by John Chamberlain. April 17 through May 26, 2018.

Source: Gagosian Gallery

Chamberlain’s distinctive metal sculptures, often made of crushed and torqued automobile steel, reveal both the stately grace and the expressive plasticity of industrial materials. Exploring the interplay of color, sheen, weight, and balance, Chamberlain taps into the dynamic energy of Abstract Expressionism, the pre-manufactured elements of Pop and Minimalism, and the provocative curves and swells of high baroque.

In this exhibition, large-scale floor sculptures and wall-mounted works made over the course of four decades attest to the seemingly infinite variations of shape and color that Chamberlain explored throughout his career. The centerpiece, ENTIRELYFEARLESS (2009), towers over the viewer, its scrunched red sides bracketed by car bumpers in shiny silver chrome. As fluid as folded drapery, and arresting as a marble monument, it subverts expectations of both abstraction and representation, while exuding a subtle figural quality. In BISHOPBUDD (2009), a nest of twisted metal strips sits atop a huddle of larger contorted planes of black and white steel—the robust, doming form recalling both an elegant tree and a menacing mushroom cloud. Chamberlain fostered a keen appreciation for poetry during the year he spent at Black Mountain College in 1955, and began to consider language as an integral part of his aesthetic approach. His dynamic titles—usually in all caps without spacing—often act as semiotic echoes of the sculptures themselves.

WANDERINGWHISPER (1986) and MURMUR (2002) show the evolution of Chamberlain’s use of color, with a rosette-like swirl of silver, orange, and red in the former, embellished with occasional scratches and dents, and bold turquoise, green, and purple in the latter, brightly reminiscent of the graphics, graffiti, and decals of the early 2000s. On the wall, the more muted tones of Rebel Ruckus (1975) contrast with GLEAMINGSPOTLIGHT (1992), in which rust peeks out from the twists and folds of polished metal, creating distorted, overlapping reflections.



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John Chamberlain - Poetic Form - Gagosian Gallery (exhibition, 2016)


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