Childe Hassam - Gathering Flowers in a French Garden, 1888

Childe Hassam - Gathering Flowers in a French Garden, 1888

Paths to Impressionism: French and American Landscape Paintings at the Newark Art Museum


Paths to Impressionism: French and American Landscape Paintings from the Worcester Art Museum, a forty-two painting exhibition featuring masterworks by Claude Monet, Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, George Inness and Childe Hassam

September 17th 2008 - January 4th 2009

Impressionism flourished in nineteenth-century France and the United States as one of the most powerful forms of artistic expression and continues to draw the appreciation and admiration of art lovers throughout the world

With the opening on September 17 of Paths to Impressionism: French and American Landscape Paintings from the Worcester Art Museum, a forty-two painting exhibition featuring masterworks by Claude Monet, Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, George Inness and Childe Hassam, The Newark Museum provides an opportunity to examine one of the most popular styles in the history of art. When combined with visits to the Museum’s permanent Picturing America galleries and its concurrent exhibition, Small but Sublime: Intimate Views by Durand, Bierstadt and Inness, visitors are treated to a compelling overview of the century’s major developments in landscape painting.

By the end of the nineteenth century, Impressionism had become the avant-garde painting style in America. According to The Newark Museum Director Mary Sue Price, “both the Worcester Art Museum and The Newark Museum built impressive collections of nineteenth-century landscape paintings by being in the forefront of acquiring American art.”

“The landscapes exhibited in Worcester’s Paths to Impressionism as well as those in The Newark Museum’s Picturing America and Small but Sublime provide a remarkable survey of the dramatic changes in the interpretation of nature that occurred during the nineteenth century,” Price said.

“The inspiring masterworks in Paths to Impressionism convey artists’ personal response to their environment,” commented Dr. Holly Pyne Connor, Curator of 19th-Century American Art at The Newark Museum. “In these beautiful paintings, nature is transformed into great art.”

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